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Katie Ulrich's picture
August 14, 2020

Yesmar Oyarzun's Sketch 7

Hi Yesmar! Your sketch 7 resonated with me a lot. I think you identify a crucial aspect of the question of 'STS beyond academia,' which is, what if the 'beyond' that we're invested in is still within or via other academic or professional realms? I struggled in my sketch with figuring out who my audience might be, and I'm realizing that that was not because I wasn't sure who I wanted to speak to, but because they didn't feel "beyond" enough. I also really liked what you said about not only thinking about dermatologists but WITH them as well. I would love to hear more about your experiences/plans with publishing with dermatologists, since I've been trying to sort out similar possibilities in my research too.

Katie Ulrich's picture
August 14, 2020

Megan Wiessner's Sketch 4

Hello Megan! When reading your Wishlist 2070 I was stuck by how you organized your bullets between ethnographic projects and theoretical/historical/institutional goals. It made me think about my own process with this sketch; I remember not being fully sure what the difference between 'topics' and 'issues' was but still just listing everything out in one single list. But I'd like to try doing what you did too and see if I come up with different things. In general I'd like to think more about how making sublists versus one single list can structure one's thinking differently around such a prompt. 

Amanda N Windle's picture
August 14, 2020

Hi Mike, the image really does work for a book cover! There would be so many options to colour pic out of the image for the text. What colour would you imagine the text to be if picked from your cover?  

If you had to go with a press that gives you pre-designed book covers like the Pivot range, what colours and patterns would you go for, what 3-4 keywords would help you to make that decision? Here are some already published: https://www.palgrave.com/gp/campaigns/palgrave-pivot

Amanda N Windle's picture
August 14, 2020

Hi Caroline, you have one image that mentions data a lot.

If you were to make one of these a book cover say for MIT Press, in order which one would you choose? What 2-3 lines of text would you give the designer to interpret the image into the main parts of a bookcover, could you start to collect images that might begin a moodboard for inspiration?

If you had to go with a press that gives you pre-designed book covers like the Pivot range, what colours and patterns would you go for and why? What 3-4 keywords would help you to make that decision? Here are some already published: https://www.palgrave.com/gp/campaigns/palgrave-pivot

Amanda N Windle's picture
August 14, 2020

Hi Alexandra, three very different images that would inspire a book cover. They are images I could imagine inside a book, but not yet the bookcover. So, What 2-3 lines of text would you give the designer to interpret the images as inspiration to design? This often happens for presses that enable you to choose your own covers, see many of the covers for Duke University Press or MIT Press, or Mattering Press.

If you had to go with a press that gives you pre-designed book covers like the Pivot range, what colours and patterns would you go for, what 3-4 keywords would help you to make that decision? Here are some already published: https://www.palgrave.com/gp/campaigns/palgrave-pivot

Amanda N Windle's picture
August 14, 2020

Hi Linda, all your images could be used as bookcovers. If you were to make one of these a book cover say for MIT Press, in order which one would you choose? What 2-3 lines of text would you give the designer to interpret the image into the main parts of a bookcover, i.e. which image, with what style of typography (handwritten - look at the designs of Stefan Sagmeister, helvetica or something else) what colour would the text be in complement or in contrast to the image? 

If you had to go with a press that gives you pre-designed book covers like the Pivot range, what colours and patterns would you go for, what 3-4 keywords would help you to make that decision? Here are some already published: https://www.palgrave.com/gp/campaigns/palgrave-pivot

Amanda N Windle's picture
August 14, 2020

Hi Jessica,

You chose images that tell a story, that lead the viewer in like a detective trying to solve a mystery. I'm viewing your images through the lens of a designer given the task of designing your book cover from these inspirational images. The second image, of a map with little iconic images of logs and petrochemicals (I think), reminds me of the RSA Animate series: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u6XAPnuFjJc

If say, you're book was chosen by a press that gives you limited pre-made patterns and colours to work with, what shapes and colours might you glean from your chosen images, or to back to your research to images taht don't necessarily tell a story but symbolise and summarise the aspect of your research project?

Have a look at the Pivot books by Palgrave Macmillan for their existing book covers to see what I mean: https://www.palgrave.com/gp/campaigns/palgrave-pivot? While shapes come from the middle illustrative image, what about colour? Two of your images show cars. Are cars really important in your project or is the location and the geographic spaces that your images describe. You also chose images that do not contain people. You might want to look at Laura Watt's book The Orkney Sagas, her photographs in the book do not show people at all, and that was purposeful, but there are illustrations. You can read a review of the book here on Backchannels, the 4S Blog: https://www.4sonline.org/blog/post/why_feminist_figurations_matter_in_energy_futures

If say you were publishing for MIT Press, what short 2-3 lines of text might you give to a designer given the commission of your book cover? What typographic style would you want, what colours might complement the text and imagery? How might they work together? Would collecting project/research imagery as a moodboard help you in the future were you to be heading to publish this research as a book?

Amanda N Windle's picture
August 14, 2020

Hi Sofie,

You chose a range of images by artists involving sculpture and drawing, but you also chose a series of code. The latter may be the inspiration for a book cover, and I think would inspire a designer given that brief.

If say, you're book was chosen by a press that gives you limited pre-made patterns and colours to work with, what shapes and colours might you glean from your chosen images? Have a look at the Pivot books by Palgrave Macmillan for their existing book covers to see what I mean: https://www.palgrave.com/gp/campaigns/palgrave-pivot? While your shapes may be indicated for you in the last image, what about colour? 

If say you were publishing for MIT Press, what short 2-3 lines of text might you give to a designer given the commission of your book cover, so what typographic style would you want, what colours might complement the text and imagery? How might they work together? Would collecting project/research imagery as a moodboard help you in the future were you to get there?

Amanda N Windle's picture
August 14, 2020

Hi Hannah, 

You chose a range of images involving a singular portrait of a data thugger, is that correct pronoun? You also chose what is called in design, an icon. 

I wonder, are these images more of a "moodboard", or a collection of "ephemeral objects" and imagery that might inspire a book cover? If say, you're book was chosen by a press that gives you limited pre-made patterns and colours to work with, what shapes and colours might you glean from your chosen images? Have a look at the Pivot books by Palgrave Macmillan for their existing book covers to see what I mean: https://www.palgrave.com/gp/campaigns/palgrave-pivot? If you had tlo choose from the existing colours and covers what would you choose? What shapes and colours would be the essence of your research ideas and arguments?

August 14, 2020

Hey Clara,

I find your area of study to be very interesting. I am working on a project in India where I am tracking how the mobile application is tracking covid patients in India and how people are responding to it.

I would like to know, what attitude do you find in application developers while coding, how much aware are they about surveillance issues and privacy?

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